WordPressOnce upon a time, dadams.co.uk was published using hand-crafted HTML. Updating the site was pain-staking and laborious work for the editorial staff, and a walk-out over poor working conditions in early 2007 prompted a re-think in the strategy. It just so happened that the company hosting the hallowed pages offered several options for a more automated style of publishing, among them WordPress.

The lead editor and Chief Technology Officer (that’s me) set up a site and started testing. At that time WordPress was at version 2.1 and nearly 4 years old, but already had a plethora of available themes and plugins. In April 2007 dadams.co.uk made a triumphant return and featured new capabilities for the editorial staff and for you, dear reader (mainly the ability to leave comments). Since then the site has gone through a number of facelifts. I’m grateful for the efforts of people more clever than me, for it allowed me to tweak existing themes to get the look I’ve wanted (several times).

dadams.co.uk in 2008I don’t have the original theme used (well, I may have on a backup drive somewhere), but the image here shows the site with its 2008 design (click on the small image to see it full size). Tasty.

The official WordPress blog details the progress of the popular blogging system over the past 10 years. According to WordPress supremo Matt Mullenweg, the technology he fathered now runs 18% of the web. That’s incredible, especially when you consider the amount of data given over to images of grumpy cats. Despite the huge range of themes, it’s often easy to spot a WordPress site – and it’s amazing how many high-profile sites use WordPress for publishing (for example, Time Magazine).

Congratulations to everyone associated with WordPress on reaching the 10 year milestone. With version 3.6 being made available soon, the improvements keep coming – and I know you’re all looking forward to another 10 years of dadams.co.uk wit and humour.

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